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Hydro To Dirt Transfers


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#1 peacefulfield

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:19 PM

I'm looking to get a few teens that are grown in net pots. I have been a dirt grower all my life & would like to give hydro a try...

 

#1. Is their a safe way to transfer them into dirt with out ph problems or shock yellowing n such?

#2. What is the best option or a low maintenance style of hydro for a dirt grower?

#3. I do have 5-7 gal vented soil pots that look like net pots, is their something I do with those?


Edited by peacefulfield, 12 November 2013 - 12:19 AM.


#2 Guanotea1

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:52 PM

My understanding is that far beyond the cloning stage hydro --> dirt will cause a sort of "shock".

A google search of hydro to dirt yields this thread

http://forum.grassci...hydro-soil.html

and many others that will answer your first question.

 

That being said you will find countless people that have done both just fine. As far as that goes I've never had that problem.

 

Back to hydro

You can always drip to waste right in those pots, if you have the dripper setup res and a drain table/channel then why not?

Are they currently in coco or hydroton? I can't see why you couldn't drip (probably the easiest) to waste in a coco/hydroton filled 5 gallon net pot on top of an ebb and flow table / drain channel. That is almost what I do, I just use a different medium (soil or straight perlite) and a slightly different pot (fabric pot to hold in the soil or perlite).

 

You can also run a "monster bucket" or ebb and flow bucket system, cap, titan, many others make them. Now that we are talking you could also do RDWC like the current culture system if you really want to get nuts.

 

The last part of the question strikes me as strange. I guess because at this point you can use almost any hydroponic system you want, provided it's big enough to accept the plant.It's possible I don't understand that part of your q.



#3 peacefulfield

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:08 AM

Thanks for the reply... I'm a little scared knowing the catastrophes that can happen when not home or losing power with hydro etc..  I really want these strains so I'm willing to give hydro a try & not sure bubble buckets are for me. The only drip irrigation I have ever ran was 6,000 feet of drip line for strawberry plants outside.


Edited by peacefulfield, 12 November 2013 - 12:21 AM.


#4 pic book

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:47 AM

dirt to hydro=you must be lucky  

i,ve had it work out, but most times not.

buy clones in rockwool--works for dirt and water



#5 Guanotea1

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:12 AM

Interesting Pic Book. I'd never try to change medium half way through, especially not dirt to 'dro, you're a braver man than I.

I have transplanted clones from an "aerocloner": to soil though, hundreds of times? No problem with that method. In fact If I ever were to take in an outside clone I'd want it packed in water - no medium no thanks.

 

Awesome! I worked on a berry farm too! That's going way back though.

Heck this will be a lot easier than laying 6000' of drip line. haha, I think you got this one.

 

Drip to waste systems really aren't that bad, a little pvc, little pump, timer, res, drip manifold, drain channel, drip line, drip emitters (mmmmmm I bought them but don't use em'), and voila! Drip hydroponics. Probably the hardest part is plumbing up a drain, my solution was to use a little sump pump and send the waste into the shower I swear I'm gonna remodel one day, haha, my girlfriend loves me.

 

The ebb and flow guys can chime in here if they want, I think those bucket systems will cost you good dime, I don't know if there is any additional growth or if it's worth it. Honestly I couldn't tell ya. As far as growth rates go I know for a fact coming from a long time soil grower you are about to be blown away as that was my situation ummm... last month! I just started some plants in rockwool just for fun on my table and now they are 2x the size of the ones I planted in soil. They are side by side on the same table under the same style lights. Same everything just different medium and using some powdered fertilizer I had made up instead of organics. Whoa very surpising!

 

Make sure you reinforce your tables if you are setting really big plants on top of those big plastic tables. I ran a few 2x4s on the perimeter of the table and also 2 2x4's underneath the table cutting the table into thirds lengthwise. If that makes any sense, I don't know. If in the future you don't like hydroponics medium, you can use the exact same setup with soil as your medium, it's pretty awesome! If I had known how cool dripping to waste would be I would have done it a lot earlier. I even like the table I had to build too, makes it way easier to get at the plants and clean the floor.



#6 grassmatch

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:34 AM

I did this a lot for awhile, and usually saw some suffering, but not much. I found that a complete rinse/removal of any hydro rocks or other substrate before the transplant was key. I suspended the roots over the new pot, and twirled them if too long until the plant was at the height I wanted, and slowly dropped loose moist soil down over the roots, until the plant can support itself. I water lightly to settle and top off with more soil, and water. I spray the plant with fresh water to help facilitate its needs until the roots can recover and do their job .  This will adversely affect a flowering plant, don't that !

 

good luck



#7 Guanotea1

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:38 PM

Great. I suspect that for a long time soil grower, that's the easiest route, glad to hear it worked out for you!

 

The best growers I know have had hydroponics and dirt farms, successful in both arenas. but in the end, after many years, they settled on the dirt. Most be some magic in that outdated medium I tell you!



#8 grassmatch

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:58 PM

back to earth I think, until we're actually forced to grow in space, or with half the water usage. hehe

hydro days were a blast, satisfied many tinkering urges, was awesome control, but with that came education

and an appreciation for biological actions, ones that can only take place synergistically with the bacteria

fungi, and animal life found only in healthy natural soil. I wont go back



#9 peacefulfield

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:07 AM

Ok great posts here but I have 1 last question..
Why do most growers that master hydro go back to dirt? I mean hydro is faster growth. Im most interested in the accelerated growth in veg & the science of it all.. But Ive always used soil only because Its what I know & I feel that the best quality is dirt organics.. Also the if its not broke don't fix it theory.

Edited by peacefulfield, 13 November 2013 - 05:24 AM.


#10 grassmatch

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:57 AM

<p>hydro is faster. who needs faster?&nbsp; there is nowhere to&nbsp; absorb overages, and seasoned growers can easily tip the scales.</p>
<p>dirt is slower, but comparatively, I love my dirt results exactly 2.9 times better than my hydro results. The 2.9 was enough for me !!&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>when it comes to production, for legal sale to a pharmacy or dispensary, I'm guessing growers will use proven standardized methods of production, including hydro technologies. Medicine, in their opinion, needs to be standardized, and dirt don't cut it. A hydroponic regimen will first identify every component available to the plant, unlike a dirt grow, tor a standardized approach. Ideally, according to them, one joint will be identical to the next one. This will be accomplished just like every other standardized vegetable, like corn and beans, completely engineered plants, cultured and propagated.&nbsp;</p>
<p>Hydroponics is safer than &quot;dirt&quot; growing, especially when using organic fertilizers. These fertilizers, compared to pure basal salts, are often made with composted poop, and bacteria like ecoli can slip in.&nbsp;Bagged poop is not yet regulated.</p>
<p>&nbsp;This is evident when researching food recalls. These recalls happen much more often on the organic scene than in the fields of veggies grown with basal salts for over a hundred years with no issues. Basal salts are not chemical fertilizers, and are not synthetic foods. As of now, there are no synthetic foods available for plants. Some ferts are synthetically(chemically) chelated, to&nbsp;facilitate more efficient&nbsp;root absorption/uptake.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>I give fertilizers no thought anymore, for years. I concentrate on my living soil, recycled with love, and booming with workers. I somehow always knew that my plants already have a set of directions to follow, as long as I provide them the Black Gold I'm so good at making !</p>

Edited by grassmatch, 13 November 2013 - 06:21 AM.


#11 beourbud

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 10:28 AM

Ok great posts here but I have 1 last question..
Why do most growers that master hydro go back to dirt? I mean hydro is faster growth. Im most interested in the accelerated growth in veg & the science of it all.. But Ive always used soil only because Its what I know & I feel that the best quality is dirt organics.. Also the if its not broke don't fix it theory.

 

After the pet rock, cabbage patch, WMD...they know you will buy anything

 

They always go back to dirt because it is the best ...read  closer to Nature

 

The term organic has been diluted.  

 

The Closer to Nature...the more organic....The closer to a chemistry lab...,not so much     imo

 

Happy Plants Play In the Dirt!


Edited by beourbud, 13 November 2013 - 10:38 AM.


#12 grassmatch

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 01:00 PM

"they" meaning us caregivers ?  I definitely don't view my patients in that light. Mine are educated, successful, well adjusted people booming with life. They are most often happily married and responsible individuals. These are strangers that find me online mind you, not buddies and babysitters. I have equal reports of caregivers being "good" and "bad". I would never be silly enough to think I could satisfy Every patient with my gear and my service. I lay it all out, and the right people find me. I finish with a one or two emails chock full of a question answer style interview q, and make a decision based on my observations. I don't try to sell garbage,to the contrary. If anything less than medical value is harvested patients never see it. No subpar finisher ever makes it out, due to my diligent quality control efforts.

 

I started mj in hydro, and enjoyed it much. I traded the slower veg for a better control over my nutrient source, which was difficult to trust at the grow store. Anybody is allowed to bottle anything and label it anyway they want there, and my patients deserved better. Incidentally, my plants were expressing fuller more developed profiles, I no longer worry of heavy metals and synthetic chelators and mystery applications. I no longer expose my self daily to these bottled wonders. My plants are stronger, more disease resistant, more fibrous, tastier, with an overall presence of health, rather than spoon fed laziness. These were all bonuses to me, not the original motivations though.

 

I can think of many reasons why other hydro's make the change;

money savings

water storage

flood risks

electrocution risk

timer failures

pump failures

nutrient disposal issues

heavy metal exposure

constant grow store shopping

substrate disposal

 are some I've heard.

 

my hydro was superior boutique smoke also, and it was always enjoyed, but I feel safer now, and more natural. even the hoses I use to water are food safe now, and my patients are aware of my advancements towards a more sustainable product, grown as naturally as I can. I visit the grow store just once per year , for a bale of pro mix and two bags of happy frog, poly grow bags.  I wouldn't register a patient who didn't care enough to ask how I grow, or one who fancied pet rocks,  is there such a thing ?

After the pet rock, cabbage patch, WMD...they know you will buy anything

 

They always go back to dirt because it is the best ...read  closer to Nature

 

The term organic has been diluted.  

 

The Closer to Nature...the more organic....The closer to a chemistry lab...,not so much     imo

 

Happy Plants Play In the Dirt!


Edited by grassmatch, 13 November 2013 - 01:01 PM.





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