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Dea Going To Put Kratom On Schedule One


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#161 swamper

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 10:01 AM

It is exactly idiots like this lady, no surprise that she works in the VA Healthcare system, spouting off ill-informed propaganda that makes it hard for people to take care of themselves as they see fit! She advocates using prescription drugs and states that Kratom costs $1000 a kilo ($30 an ounce). I have been successfully using Kratom the past 3 months for chronic pain  and am no longer on opioids. If these kind of mindless drones get what they want, myself and countess others are going to be hurt!
 

Kratom: The new alternative to opioids

Sherril Sego, FNP-C, DNP, is a staff clinician at the VA Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., where she practices adult medicine and women’s health. She also teaches at the nursing schools of the University of Missouri and the University of Kansas.

Safety, interactions, side effects
The safety of this product is definitely in question. Due to its known opioid action, addiction and overdose are easily possible. In August 2016, the DEA published a notice of intent to classify this compound as a schedule I drug.9 Due to a huge public response, however, a formal retraction of that intent was published in October 2016, pending further review.9
Regardless of regulation, kratom should be considered an opioid compound and, as such, possess all of the potential side effects and interactions of the class. Until such studies are conducted that more clearly show safety and efficacy for specific uses, there is no current indication for this compound.
How supplied, dose, cost
Kratom is widely available in the United States either online or in most ‘head shops.' It is available in a variety of forms including extract, powder, or capsule. Due to the lack of any quality control, there is no way to establish a ‘recommended dose.' Also, the concentration of the active ingredient, mitragynine, varies widely based on the form of the product. Extracts tend to be more concentrated, while powders and capsules are weaker.
Those who report sporadic use for anxiety or other episodic concerns may only use 1 to 2 g at a time, whereas daily users managing chronic pain or intense withdrawal from other opiates report using as much as 15 to 20 g or more per day. The type of product and the amount used dictate cost, with an average cost per ounce of about $30.
Summary
With the abundance of approved medications at the disposal of healthcare providers, the use of an unproven and potentially dangerous product such as kratom is not justified. However, providers must be aware of the growing use of this compound in the United States and, when opioid use is either ongoing or newly initiated, screen for use of this product.
 


Edited by swamper, 07 January 2017 - 10:02 AM.


#162 cristinew

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 12:16 PM

Now we have an Idiot in Fla. Pushing a bill to ban it there again This is her third attempt  She has a grudge for some reason.

 

http://www.myflorida...px?BillId=56839   

 

http://floridapoliti...olled-substance

 

http://www.myflorida...lativeTermId=87

 

Rotten to the core this women is.



#163 cristinew

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 11:58 AM

Now  New York    http://assembly.stat...ummary=Y&Text=Y 



#164 swamper

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 12:37 PM

 

Now that it has been brought to national attention, all the do-gooders will want to promulgate the all of the false propaganda to make themselves feel better. In the case of  Florida freshman Democratic State Rep. Kristen Jacobs, she is using the suicide death of 1 person to further her political career by trying to link Kratom to the death, despite the fact that this person had several antidepressant drugs known to cause suicidal thoughts in his system, and history of substance abuse. Kratom does not make people jump off of bridges!



#165 cristinew

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 11:40 AM

On Friday, Florida Politics brought you the first look at a House bill that would add Kratom to the state’s controlled substance list.

House Bill 183 would add Mitragynine and Hydroxymitragynine, constituents of Kratom, to the schedule of controlled substances, offering an exception for any FDA approved substance containing these chemicals.

Bill sponsor Rep. Kristin Jacobs, a Coconut Creek Democrat who has filed anti-Kratom legislation in three straight sessions, framed this bill as a “fall on the sword issue” for her, while framing the Kratom lobby in the harshest possible terms.

“They have a story,” Jacobs told us Monday via phone. “Just like Hitler believed if you tell a lie over and over again, it becomes the truth.”

For Jacobs, the issue is personal: a legislative quest against a “lie machine … a powerful lobby with a lot of money,” undertaken by one representative who isn’t being backed financially to fight this issue.

“It’s not just what they’re doing here,” Jacobs said. “They’re doing [the same thing] around the country.”

Jacobs, who believes Kratom is a “scourge on society,” expects the DEA to temporarily schedule Kratom as Schedule 1 now that its period for public comment has elapsed; that would leave it up to state legislators to move toward rulemaking in the session.

Jacobs also stresses that her legislation is intended to punish the industry, not the “unfortunate people who [are] addicted.”

That said, she sees no functional difference between the use of Kratom and opiate addiction. Jacobs is comfortable talking about Kratom in the same breath as heroin and the late and unlamented pill mills.

Kratom, said the representative, “is an opiate.” And Jacobs believes it’s used because it’s legal, and “people turn to something.”

Jacobs paints nightmare scenarios: babies born with withdrawal symptoms to pregnant mothers who enjoyed kava tea during their pregnancy; emergency room physicians treating Kratom addicts who are in the throes of withdrawal symptoms.

And, implies Jacobs, it is that dependency on a drug that leads activists to mobilize in Kratom fights outside of their home areas.

“Why do addicts in Michigan care about what’s happening in Florida?”

Meanwhile, says Jacobs, “the Kratom Association stands to lose a lot of money if they aren’t able to continue profiting off the misery of addicts.”

Those “addicts with glassy eyes and shaky hands,” claims Jacobs, are having to go to the same places that sell “bongs and gasoline” for their fixes.

“How come pharmacies don’t sell it? How come GNC doesn’t sell it?”

Jacobs is girding up for a presence of Kratom advocates in Tallahassee this session, complete with “cute little t-shirts.”

Those are the tactics, the representative says, that are being used across the country.

But to her, the fight is worth it.

“How many more are going to die?”

MICHIGAN???? I wonder why she said Michigan? Hmmm



#166 cristinew

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 11:41 AM

This democrat is pure evil.  She makes rick jones and bs look like saints.. 


Edited by cristinew, 10 January 2017 - 11:41 AM.


#167 swamper

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 05:55 PM

This democrat is pure evil.  She makes rick jones and bs look like saints.. 

 

Doing the same thing over and over expecting different results, she is the definition of insane! Not to mention the absurd Hitler comment and calling the AKA a powerful lobbying group trying to get wealthy off of Kratom. Nothing could be further from the truth.



#168 bax

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 06:07 PM

LOL someone in michigan bothered her! hey it wasnt me!

Edited by bax, 10 January 2017 - 06:07 PM.

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#169 cristinew

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 07:06 PM

Those “addicts with glassy eyes and shaky hands,” claims Jacobs,   ha ha.  Was that me she was talking about?? that Drug Addict from Michigan..


Edited by cristinew, 10 January 2017 - 07:07 PM.


#170 cristinew

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 06:15 PM

http://www.prnewswir...300392756.html 

 

BETHESDA, Md.Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Kratom leaves, from a South East Asian tree in the coffee family, are often used to prepare tea-like beverages and commercially manufactured products which are consumed by several million Americans annually to increase alertness, enhance well-being and occupational performance, and as a natural remedy for minor aches and pains. PinneyAssociates' review of the scientific evidence regarding kratom's effects is intended to assist FDA and DEA in determining the most appropriate regulatory approach within FDA authority to permit appropriate use, minimize unintended effects, encourage research, and contribute to the enhancement of public health.

DEA had proposed placing kratom in Schedule I (which includes drugs such as heroin and LSD), the most restrictive category of the Controlled Substances Act. In practical terms, this would have banned the sale of kratom and posed a major roadblock to research. The American Kratom Association petitioned the DEA to withdraw its proposal. PinneyAssociates' was then contracted to review the available information about kratom and develop an "8-factor analysis", the legal  framework used to assess the abuse potential of substances, about kratom for submission to the FDA, DEA, and National Institute on Drug Abuse to inform the deliberations regarding regulation of kratom. See more about this in press coverage by Wired, Forbes, and the Washington Post.

One of the authors of the kratom 8-factor analysis was Dr. Jack Henningfield, Vice President of Research, Health Policy and Abuse Liability, at PinneyAssociates, and Adjunct Professor of Behavioral Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Henningfield commented, "It's important to understand that although kratom has some mild effects similar to opioids,  its chemical make-up is different, and it appears overall much safer, with apparently relatively small effects on respiration. In fact, kratom's  analgesic effects and impact on energy, combined with its favorable safety profile supports continued access by consumers to appropriately regulated kratom products while research on its uses continues." Furthermore, he said "surveys suggest that kratom products are used by many former opioid users as a naural remedy to help them abstain from opioids."

Dr. Henningfield concluded, "Our work on kratom is an example of how we help regulators and industry make scientifically informed decisions about the risks and benefits of pharmaceuticals and nutritional supplements. This is a key facet of the work we produce at the intersection of science and public health policy." The kratom abuse potential assessment is an example of the comprehensive abuse potential assessments and CSA 8-factor assessments that PinneyAssociates scientists develop for pharmaceutical companies to submit to the FDA in support of CNS-acting products including opioids, ADHD stimulants, anti-epileptics, and sedative sleep aids.

About PinneyAssociates

PinneyAssociates is a pharmaceutical and consumer healthcare consulting company that helps clients to reduce their regulatory risk and enhance the commercial value of their life sciences products. PinneyAssociates consults with pharmaceutical companies that market a wide variety of prescription and over-the-counter medications. PinneyAssociates' experts have extensive expertise in abuse-deterrent drug formulation evaluation, abuse potential assessment, as well as pharmaceutical risk management, Rx-to-OTC switch, and tobacco harm reduction.

For more information about PinneyAssociates, please contact us at +1.301.718.8440 or info@pinneyassociates.com, or learn more about our work at www.pinneyassociates.com

SOURCE PinneyAssociates

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http://www.pinneyassociates.com


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#171 AmishRnot4ganja

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 07:42 PM

I'm sure that this has been noted before, but it seems like coffee, if it wasn't already so deeply ingrained in society, would be a candidate for the controlled substance list. It is already illegal for Mormons...

Religious zealots: I don't care what you do with your bodies. Why are you so obsessed about what I do with mine? And what is your problem with science? Could it be that it casts doubt upon your infantile religious beliefs?
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#172 swamper

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 08:25 PM

 

kratom's  analgesic effects and impact on energy, combined with its favorable safety profile supports continued access by consumers to appropriately regulated kratom products

 

 All well and good until we get to this part:

 

 

while research on its uses continues

 

Which tells us what exactly?



#173 swamper

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 08:37 AM

And another Democrat, from the party of compassion, has jumped on board the "Ban Wagon."

 

Senate companion filed for controversial Kratom ban bill

One of the more controversial bills filed in the Florida House this session, a proposed ban of constituent elements for kratom, saw a Florida Senate companion emerge Monday.

Senate Bill 424, filed by Democrat Darryl Rouson, mirrors the House bill.

Both bills would add Mitragynine and Hydroxymitragynine, constituents of Kratom, to the schedule of controlled substances, offering an exception for any FDA approved substance containing these chemicals.

Selling, delivering, manufacturing, or importing these Kratom chemical constituents into Florida would be considered a misdemeanor of the first degree under either bill.

Even before Rouson’s version was filed, the House bill filed by Rep. Kristin Jacobs, a Democrat from Coconut Creek, got national scrutiny.

Jacobs, in a no-holds-barred interview with FloridaPolitics.com, compared kratom advocates to one of history’s greatest villains.

“They have a story,” Jacobs told us via phone. “Just like Hitler believed if you tell a lie over and over again, it becomes the truth.”

Contrary to the many assertions from kratom users that the herbal remedy helps them manage pain, anxiety, and other debilitating conditions, Jacobs brought forth a “kratom madness” style of rhetoric when dismissing those who use the substance.

Jacobs described kratom users as “addicts with glassy eyes and shaky hands.”

Kratom advocates forcefully countered such descriptions soon after that.

Rouson received campaign contributions in 2016 from at least one party with a vested interest in a kratom ban.

Mark Fontaine, the former executive director of the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association, gave Rouson $400.

“Caremark Rx,” a division of the CVS drugstore chain, gave Rouson $1,000.

ABC Fine Wine and Spirits, which sells liquor, gave $1,000 on two occasions during the 2016 cycle. Meanwhile, the Beer Distributors Committee, Wine and Spirits Distributors, and Southern Wine and Spirits all gave $1,000 once.

Betty Sembler, the wife of anti-cannabis crusader Mel Sembler, gave Rouson $500.

We’ve reached out to Sen. Rouson to ask if he aligns with Rep. Jacobs’ comments, and whether or not his campaign’s financial backing factored into his decision to file companion legislation to a bill bounced out of the Florida Legislature in each of the last two sessions.



#174 cristinew

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 06:10 AM

Big Pharma  Democrats trying to take our liberties  shame on them...



#175 cristinew

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 07:33 AM

http://www.cnbc.com/...-about-fda.html   We do have hope..

 

The two tech investors tied to Peter Thiel met with president-elect Donald Trump on Thursday, and discussed, among other things, the possible future of the FDA.

Balaji Srinivasan, CEO of bitcoin start-up 21.co, and Jim O'Neill, the managing director of investment firm Mithril Capital Management, were both scheduled to meet with Trump Thursday afternoon. Both "are being considered for positions in the FDA," incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer said on a daily briefing call. 

Srinivasan, also a partner at venture firm Andreessen Horowitz, is an expert in the subjects of digital payments and computational biology, and teaches at Stanford University. Srinivasan's expertise in health regulation stems back to a start-up he co-founded, Counsyl, which offers DNA screening, especially for people considering having children. 

Paypal founder Peter Thiel becomes marijuana's first big investor

 A long time and marijuana industry known silicon valley marijuana advocate Jim O’Neil could be the new head of the FOOD & DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA).

Trump could select biotech executive Balaji Srinivasan to lead the Food and Drug Administration. Sources close to the situation add that the enigmatic Srinivasan is the second candidate for the FDA post — after billionaire Silicon Valley investor Jim O’Neill — to have strong connections to tech mogul Peter Thiel, a staunch supporter of both Trump and the legal marijuana industry.


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#176 King_Rascal

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 02:43 PM

Other than online can this be procured at any local head shops or anything like that? I'm about to start opiate withdrawal in the next day or two. I would like some of this to help me get through it
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#177 swamper

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 04:03 PM

Other than online can this be procured at any local head shops or anything like that? I'm about to start opiate withdrawal in the next day or two. I would like some of this to help me get through it

 

I understand it can be found in head shops, but it will be expensive and probably extracts and not the plain leaf. Personally I would stay away from that option.When ordering online I have not waited more than 3 days to receive my order. You are going to need at least a half kilo to get you through the withdrawals and more if you suffer from chronic pain, as an option instead of prescription narcotics. Go to the Kratom Reddit (https://www.reddit.com/r/kratom/) and you will find a list of reputable vendors including prices along with other peoples experiences. Good Luck!

 

I would also strongly suggest that anyone entertaining the thought of using Kratom also go to the Quitting Kratom Reddit (https://www.reddit.c...quittingkratom/) where you will find the stories of withdrawals from this plant that happen to be a lot more than the "It's like quitting coffee" B.S. If it sound to good to be true, it most likely is!


Edited by swamper, 07 February 2017 - 09:02 AM.

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#178 cristinew

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 04:27 PM

WASHINGTON, D.C. – (February 2, 2017) – When the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) asked for public comments late last year about its plan to impose what amounted to a ban on the coffee-like herb kratom, they may not have been prepared for both the volume of comments (23,116) and the overwhelming opposition to a ban (99.1 percent).  A new analysis by the American Kratom Association (AKA) and American Coalition of Free Citizens (ACFC) reviewed every one of the comments submitted to the DEA prior to the conclusion of its public comment period on December 1, 2016.   
 
The AKA/ACFC found several things that the DEA most likely was not expecting to see:
 
Overview of key groups.  Among those listing a profession, nearly half (48 percent) were veterans, law enforcement officials, health care professionals, and scientists.  (This reflected a total of 1175 out of 2416 comments with profession-related information.)  This groups came down strong in favor of kratom and against a ban 754 versus 9 … for a pro-kratom support level of 98.7 percent.
 
Veterans.  Those who served in the military were a large contingent among those mentioning their profession. The 449 self-identified veterans accounted for 448 comments, or 18 percent of the 2416 indicating a professional work/background.  Veterans supported kratom by a margin of 448 to 1, or 99.8 percent.
 
Health care professionals. The 576 self-identified medical professionals in the survey also came down strongly in support of kratom.  These current and retired doctors, nurses, and other  medical professionals supported kratom by a margin of 569 to 7, or 98.8 percent.
 
Older Americans.  On age, a total of 3811 comment filers indicate how old they are.  In this group, 806 (21 percent) were 55 or older.  Older American supported kratom by a margin of 805 to 1, or 99.9 percent.
 
Susan Ash, director, American Kratom Association and Jason Jeffers, president, American Coalition of Free Citizens said: “The face of kratom consumers is the face of America today.  Our groups partnered-up to examine all of the public comments to DEA on the kratom ban because we were curious about who was responding and what they had to say.  What we found is a kratom community of responsible consumers who look just like your family and the people who live next door. The results speak for themselves:  99 percent of those who comment, do not want the federal government to police the natural herb called kratom.”  
 
Katie Lair, research and communications director, American Coalition of Free Citizens, said: “The most curious thing about the public comments is that there were so few responses actually supporting the DEA.  Only 113 people out of 23,116 commented in support of the DEA proposal to ban kratom.   When you have so much anti-kratom propaganda circulating at the state level and misleading talk of a public health crisis, one would expect more public comments in support of what the DEA is trying to do.  To have just 113 people nationwide support the DEA is remarkable for a campaign like this to determine whether something should be banned for the entire nation. The topline finding is obvious: There is no public appetite for banning kratom and continued fierce opposition can be expected by anyone who cares to do so.”  
 
For this research, medical professional was defined as “medical doctors, registered nurses, psychiatrists, speech therapists and EMTs and trained first responders.”
 
The American Kratom Association led the charge when the DEA opened a public comment period running through December 1, 2016.  Of the more than 23,000 comments submitted before the deadline closed, the KratomComments.org Web site created by AKA was responsible for 16,379 comments – roughly 71 percent of total comments received at Regulations.gov. (The campaign Web site is now inactive.)
 
The findings released today by the two groups are consisted with data released by AKA in a November 2016 online survey of 105 emergency room (ER)/trauma health care professionals that found zero reported cases of deaths related to kratom. The new poll of America’s front-line medical professionals also uncovered precisely zero percent support among those surveyed for a DEA ban on the coffee-like herb kratom.
A major analysis by Dr. Jack Henningfield, Ph.D., vice president of Research, Health Policy, and Abuse Liability at PinneyAssociates, for the American Kratom Association found that there is "insufficient evidence" for the DEA to ban or otherwise restrict the coffee-like herb kratom under the Controlled Substances Act.  According to the comprehensive Henningfield report, kratom has little potential for abuse and dependence – as low or lower than such widely used and unscheduled substances as "nutmeg, hops, St. John's Wort, chamomile, guarana, and kola nut."  
ABOUT AKA
 
The America Kratom Association, a consumer-based non-profit organization, is here to set the record straight, giving a voice to those suffering and protecting our rights to possess and consume kratom. AKA represents tens of thousands of Americans, each of whom have a unique story to tell about the virtues of kratom and its positive effects on their lives. www.americankratom.org
 
ABOUT ACFC
American Coalition of Free Citizens (ACFC), a non-partisan organization with members in every state, was founded in 2016 after a statewide ban on the natural herb kratom took effect in Alabama. Our core mission is to defend the rights of people to access and choose safe and natural ethnobotanical/herbal alternatives to prescription drugs.  More broadly, ACFC defends the freedoms, rights and privileges granted to all Americans by the U.S. Constitution. As a result of the war on kratom initiated by both the federal government and state governments across the country, our group is committed to defending kratom and keeping it legal. The ACFC website is currently under construction set to launch in late winter 2017.  Our Facebook group page can be found online at: https://www.facebook...01010013260823/and our like page here: https://www.facebook...com/americfc/. 
For queries about membership, volunteering or just general information, please contact our communications department at: americfc2017@gmail.com


#179 cristinew

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 04:48 PM

http://www.huffingto...4b06f344e4074fa 

 

DEA Asked Public To Comment On Its Proposed Kratom Ban And 99 Percent Opposed It But the legal fate of the herb still hangs in the balance




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